Sure, everyone likes to boast about how tough their pickup truck is. Watch any football game on a Sunday afternoon and you’re bound to be inundated with a myriad of advertisements from no less than three auto manufacturers boasting that somehow their truck is the best in this category or that category. Even though, somehow some other company just said they were the best in literally the same category minutes prior. Whoever is in the lead in the performance leap-frog game, it’s no question that the full-sized pickup trucks are the bread winners of most of the major automakers. Chevy Silverado, Dodge Ram, Ford F-Series. They are constantly upping their game on what seems like an almost daily basis.

That’s all well and good, but when it comes down to it, the full-sized market are essentially the flashy wide receivers and quarterbacks of the truck world. The real grunt work, and true strength lies with the linemen. And in the truck world, the big, bad, tough, and no-nonsense-get-it-done mentality is what commercial trucks are all about. Purpose built and ready to work from the moment they roll off the assembly line. Today we’re going to take a look at the 2016 Ford F-650/750 model, as this recent addition was something of a turning point for the Ford lineup. For 2016 and on, Ford decided to dump their partnerships and get back to what they’re good at — building trucks. The F-650/750 are 100% Ford. No more Cummins diesel, no Allison transmission, nope. The engine is a true Ford Power Stroke turbodiesel and Ford auto trans.

From the outside, the F-650/750 may look oddly family despite their new exteriors. Well, that’s because it seems Ford doesn’t like to waste anything and recycled what looks like a multitude of appearance parts from the 2003-2008 Econoline van. The grill looks similar and the headlights are actually directly from the Econoline. Aside from the van, the F-650/750’s doors, roof, windshield, and entire cab structure for that matter are all lifted directly from the F-250. Beyond the cab however, is when the big truck starts looking like a truck. Big-rig style exterior fuel tanks flank the giant ladder frame, while the entire rear of the truck is just a blank canvas of frame rails and drivetrain parts waiting to be turned into something wonderfully useful.

That drivetrain is impressive. The Power Stroke can be had with a range of power. The base being 270 horsepower and 675 pound-feet of torque, while the next step up is 300 horsepower and 700 pound-feet of torque, and the max option is, you probably guessed it, 330 horsepower and 725 pound-feet of torque. There is a gas engine option — a very stout 6.8-liter V10 that makes a solid 320 horsepower and 460 pound-feet of torque, but we’re guessing not too many people will be opting for the non-diesel engine. For one reason or another (we’re guessing sales numbers), Ford has elected to discontinue the manual transmission option for these trucks, and instead drops in a TorqShift six-speed slush box that powers either the gas or diesel powered versions.

The interior of the F-650/750 should look somewhat similar to other Super Duty owners, as the layout is almost identical. The main difference is that with the F-650/750, the standard, and really only option is the “no frills” box. Vinyl seats, a very simple AM/FM radio, and yes, even manual windows (who knew they still existed) all serve to remind that this truck is not here to pamper you with fancy leather seats or a distracting nav system in the dashboard, or even colorful paneling about the cabin. Nope. No distractions because you have work to do!

The F-650/750 is not a flashy truck. It is the nose tackle of Ford’s lineup. Big, strong, blunt and deliberate about what it is here to do: work. It is a comfortable enough truck that can take on most any project from being a dump truck, to a tow truck, to a cargo hauler. It has versatility and with a starting price of right around 55 grand, the buy in isn’t so bad either. Sure, a full featured F-750 with the biggest engine available could tip the scales at around $70,000, but even that isn’t a crazy asking price for the amount of return you can get out of this very underrated Ford.